Kilroot 10MW Battery Energy Storage Array

AES installed a 10MW, 30-minute duration battery energy storage array (BESA), utilising AES Advancion® technology, at the operational Kilroot Power Station, integrating the technology into AES’ generating portfolio...

Source: AES
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AES installed a 10MW, 30-minute duration battery energy storage array (BESA), utilising AES Advancion® technology, at the operational Kilroot Power Station, integrating the technology into AES’ generating portfolio. The BESA functions to provide system services [1] necessary for the safe and secure operation of the All-Island electricity network, as required by Transmission System Operators (TSOs), SONI and EirGrid.

[1] Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Operating Reserve


Such services are traditionally provided by incumbent conventional thermal generators, however the BESA’s successful operation proves that such services can be provided in an innovative manner by alternate means, thereby reducing the requirement for part-loaded thermal generators. Furthermore, the BESA operates in the system services market, proving its commercial viability, without requiring subsidy.

In consortium with its project partners, InnovateUK[1] and Queens University Belfast (QUB)[2], AES installed the 10MW/5MWh Kilroot Energy Storage array (BESA) within six-months from project inception, reaching commercial operations in January 2016. The impetus behind the project was to demonstrate the commercial viability of battery energy storage as a means to provide system support services, without requiring the need for additional subsidies. The BESA commenced operation, providing frequency response/operating reserve services under an existing commercial arrangement, Harmonised Ancillary Services, later transitioning to the successor arrangement, DS3.

While demonstrating the technology’s commercial viability, the BESA has continuously provided real-time data to the Island of Ireland’s Transmission System Operators of the technical capabilities, and advantages of the technology in comparison to conventional means of providing system services[3]. Such system services are required in the routine operation of the electricity system and will increasingly be required in order to integrate greater volumes of renewable energy into the capacity mix. Battery energy storage technologies are ideally placed to provide system services, with key advantages over conventional generators.

Research undertaken by QUB, utilising real-time operational data from the BESA concluded that 360MW of batteries could prove the same amount of power after 0.1 seconds as the inertial response of 3000MW of conventional, synchronous generators. The conclusion drawn is that system stability requirements as dictated by TSOs in the Island of Ireland could theoretically be met and exceeded via the use of battery energy storage technology. Key conclusions drawn from QUB’s research include that, when compared to system services provided by conventional generators, large-scale deployment of battery energy storage technology could incur savings to the consumer in the Island of Ireland of €19M in 2019/20, while offsetting 1.4Mt of CO2 per year otherwise emitted by conventional generators.

 

[1] The United Kingdom’s innovation agency, a part of the UK public body ‘UK Research and Innovation’

[2] AES’ academic partners

[3] E.g. from existing thermal power stations